Valley of Shining Stone

Valley of Shining Stone

Author: Lesley Poling-Kempes

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816514465

Page: 272

Download BOOK

Underlying these stories is the saga of Ghost Ranch itself, a last living vestige of the Old West ideal of horses, cowboys, and wide-open spaces.

North by northwest from old Santa Fe is the winding road to Abiquiu (ah-be-cue'), Ghost Ranch, and el Valle de la Piedra Lumbre, the Valley of Shining Stone: mythical names in a near-mythical place, captured for the ages in the famous paintings of Georgia O'Keeffe. O'Keeffe saw the magic of sandstone cliffs and turquoise skies, but her life and death here are only part of the story. Reading almost like a novel, this book spills over with other legends buried deep in time, just as some of North America's oldest dinosaur bones lie hidden beneath the valley floor. Here are the stories of Pueblo Indians who have claimed this land for generations. Here, too, are Utes, Navajos, Jicarilla Apaches, Hispanos, and Anglos-many lives tangled together, yet also separate and distinct. Underlying these stories is the saga of Ghost Ranch itself, a last living vestige of the Old West ideal of horses, cowboys, and wide-open spaces. Readers will meet a virtual Who's Who of visitors from "dude ranch" days, ranging from such luminaries as Willa Cather, Ansel Adams, and Charles Lindbergh to World War II scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer and his colleagues, who were working on the top-secret atomic bomb in nearby Los Alamos. Moving on through the twentieth century, the book describes struggles to preserve the valley's wild beauty in the face of land development and increased tourism. Just as the Piedra Lumbre landscape has captivated countless wayfarers over hundreds of years, so its stories cast their own spell. Indispensable for travelers, pure pleasure for history buffs and general readers, these pages are a magic carpet to a magic land: Abiquiu, Ghost Ranch, the Valley of Shining Stone.



More Books:

Valley of Shining Stone
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Lesley Poling-Kempes
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997-07 - Publisher: University of Arizona Press

North by northwest from old Santa Fe is the winding road to Abiquiu (ah-be-cue'), Ghost Ranch, and el Valle de la Piedra Lumbre, the Valley of Shining Stone: mythical names in a near-mythical place, captured for the ages in the famous paintings of Georgia O'Keeffe. O'Keeffe saw the magic of
Ghost Ranch
Language: en
Pages: 291
Authors: Lesley Poling-Kempes
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005 - Publisher: University of Arizona Press

For more than a century, Ghost Ranch has attracted people of enormous energy and creativity to the high desert of northern New Mexico. Occupying twenty-two thousand acres of the Piedra Lumbre basin, this fabled place was the love of artist Georgia OÕKeeffeÕs life, and her depictions of the landscape catapulted
The Harvey Girls
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Lesley Poling-Kempes
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-07 - Publisher: Hachette UK

The award-winning history of the women who went West to work in Fred Harvey's restaurants along the Santa Fe railway -- and went on to shape the American Southwest From the 1880s to the 1950s, the Harvey Girls went west to work in Fred Harvey's restaurants along the Santa Fe
Ghost Ranch
Language: en
Pages: 291
Authors: Lesley Poling-Kempes
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005 - Publisher: University of Arizona Press

For more than a century, Ghost Ranch has attracted people of enormous energy and creativity to the high desert of northern New Mexico. Occupying twenty-two thousand acres of the Piedra Lumbre basin, this fabled place was the love of artist Georgia OÕKeeffeÕs life, and her depictions of the landscape catapulted
Deeply Rooted
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Lisa M. Hamilton
Categories: Nature
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-03-25 - Publisher: Catapult

A century of industrialization has left our food system riddled with problems, yet for solutions we look to nutritionists and government agencies, scientists and chefs. Lisa M. Hamilton asks: Why not look to the people who grow our food? Hamilton makes this vital inquiry through the stories of three unconventional